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The Texas Historical Commission

The Texas Historical Commission (THC) is the state agency for historic preservation, promoting the stewardship of cultural resources in Texas. THC staff consult with individuals and organizations on matters related to Texas history and support the preservation-related interests of various fields, including history, archeology, architecture, museums, economic development, heritage tourism, and urban planning. THC programs work with and through these fields to save and celebrate significant cultural resources across the state. By protecting Texas’ historic and prehistoric landmarks, the THC ensures these resources can be used for the education, enjoyment, and economic benefit of present and future generations.


The Texas Statewide Historic Preservation Plan (SWP)

As the State Historic Preservation Office, the THC must produce a SWP periodically to align preservation efforts at the local, regional, and state levels. The THC oversees the planning process and participates as one of many key stakeholders from across the state—this is a preservation plan for Texans by Texans. Stakeholders represent communities, organizations, and causes related to Texas history and cultural resources. Together, stakeholders meet, share ideas, express concerns, and prioritize goals that will move preservation forward and expand the ways in which we save what’s meaningful about Texas’ unique character.

Learn more about statewide preservation planning on the National Park Service website.


How will stakeholder comments build a foundation for the SWP?

The THC’s planning team will facilitate an extensive series of in-person and virtual public meetings from November 2021 through March 2022—more than 12 meetings, all of which enable attendees to discuss present and future preservation needs throughout the state. Ideas and concerns submitted by participants will be analyzed by the planning team to identify prevailing themes that will be explored in depth during additional virtual “town halls.”

Findings will be formalized in the planning team’s State of the State report—this document will outline key statewide historic preservation issues, opportunities, and strategies determined through the engagement process. The report also will include an analysis of key preservation trends and include a context study of state and local planning efforts. This information is the foundation for the SWP draft that, when developed, will be offered up to the public for comment in eight digital forums.

Learn more about SWP stakeholder meetings.


How will the SWP benefit stakeholders and the livelihoods of Texas communities?

The SWP’s robust engagement structure ensures that the planning process captures voices from communities and regions across the state. Using this broad range of historic preservation perspectives, the THC’s planning team will refine nine months of public comment into a final SWP. Team members will craft goals that reflect plan stakeholders and design objectives that can be implemented by Texans and organizations at the local, regional, and state levels.

As intended, Texas’ SWP will build the capacity of professionals and volunteers as we work together to preserve the historic and cultural diversity that makes our state great. Embracing our new preservation path, we will demonstrate the role preservation and preservationists play to create resilient communities.

The road to a resilient Texas includes an extensive examination of how communities address disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Read more about SWP disaster resiliency focus.


Explore Previous Texas SWPs

The THC published Texas' most recent Statewide Historic Preservation Plan in 2011, with an update in 2016. Read previous SWP documents on the THC website.

Revisit this webpage periodically to learn how to participate in the new SWP planning process.


The Texas Historical Commission

The Texas Historical Commission (THC) is the state agency for historic preservation, promoting the stewardship of cultural resources in Texas. THC staff consult with individuals and organizations on matters related to Texas history and support the preservation-related interests of various fields, including history, archeology, architecture, museums, economic development, heritage tourism, and urban planning. THC programs work with and through these fields to save and celebrate significant cultural resources across the state. By protecting Texas’ historic and prehistoric landmarks, the THC ensures these resources can be used for the education, enjoyment, and economic benefit of present and future generations.


The Texas Statewide Historic Preservation Plan (SWP)

As the State Historic Preservation Office, the THC must produce a SWP periodically to align preservation efforts at the local, regional, and state levels. The THC oversees the planning process and participates as one of many key stakeholders from across the state—this is a preservation plan for Texans by Texans. Stakeholders represent communities, organizations, and causes related to Texas history and cultural resources. Together, stakeholders meet, share ideas, express concerns, and prioritize goals that will move preservation forward and expand the ways in which we save what’s meaningful about Texas’ unique character.

Learn more about statewide preservation planning on the National Park Service website.


How will stakeholder comments build a foundation for the SWP?

The THC’s planning team will facilitate an extensive series of in-person and virtual public meetings from November 2021 through March 2022—more than 12 meetings, all of which enable attendees to discuss present and future preservation needs throughout the state. Ideas and concerns submitted by participants will be analyzed by the planning team to identify prevailing themes that will be explored in depth during additional virtual “town halls.”

Findings will be formalized in the planning team’s State of the State report—this document will outline key statewide historic preservation issues, opportunities, and strategies determined through the engagement process. The report also will include an analysis of key preservation trends and include a context study of state and local planning efforts. This information is the foundation for the SWP draft that, when developed, will be offered up to the public for comment in eight digital forums.

Learn more about SWP stakeholder meetings.


How will the SWP benefit stakeholders and the livelihoods of Texas communities?

The SWP’s robust engagement structure ensures that the planning process captures voices from communities and regions across the state. Using this broad range of historic preservation perspectives, the THC’s planning team will refine nine months of public comment into a final SWP. Team members will craft goals that reflect plan stakeholders and design objectives that can be implemented by Texans and organizations at the local, regional, and state levels.

As intended, Texas’ SWP will build the capacity of professionals and volunteers as we work together to preserve the historic and cultural diversity that makes our state great. Embracing our new preservation path, we will demonstrate the role preservation and preservationists play to create resilient communities.

The road to a resilient Texas includes an extensive examination of how communities address disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Read more about SWP disaster resiliency focus.


Explore Previous Texas SWPs

The THC published Texas' most recent Statewide Historic Preservation Plan in 2011, with an update in 2016. Read previous SWP documents on the THC website.

Revisit this webpage periodically to learn how to participate in the new SWP planning process.

Tell Us About Your Texas!

We want to hear from you! Please share success stories from your community or other Texas communities. Help us understand what is special and worth celebrating about Texas. 

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    ALBERTINE HALL YEAGER HONORED BY TEXAS HISTORICAL COMMISSION DURING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

    by marsha1878, 3 months ago

    Albertine Hall Yeager Receives Official Texas Historical Marker in Galveston

    GALVESTON, TX—The Texas Historical Commission (THC) has recognized Albertine Hall Yeager as a significant part of Texas history by awarding it an Official Texas Historical Marker. The marker is part of the Undertold Marker program at THC. The designation honors Albertine Hall Yeager as an important and educational part of local history. The marker will be erected at 1111 32nd Street, on Galveston Island on the site where her original orphanage was built in 1917. The original building was replaced in 1974. However, Mrs. Yeager operated her orphanage and daycare... Continue reading

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    ALBERTINE HALL YEAGER HONORED BY TEXAS HISTORICAL COMMISSION DURING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

    by marsha1878, 3 months ago

    Albertine Hall Yeager Receives Official Texas Historical Marker in Galveston

    GALVESTON, TX—The Texas Historical Commission (THC) has recognized Albertine Hall Yeager as a significant part of Texas history by awarding it an Official Texas Historical Marker. The marker is part of the Undertold Marker program at THC. The designation honors Albertine Hall Yeager as an important and educational part of local history. The marker will be erected at 1111 32nd Street, on Galveston Island on the site where her original orphanage was built in 1917. The original building was replaced in 1974. However, Mrs. Yeager operated her orphanage and daycare... Continue reading

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    105 Year Old 1 Room School House

    by BeeCay, 5 months ago

    Hovey Texas (see Texas Escapes Ghost Towns) is the original location of this old school house. In 1987 due to work by Margaret Newton (an alumni)and Greg McKenzie (County Commissioner) the house was moved to Fort Stockton Texas, near the site of the Old Fort. There it was rehabilitated (and continues to be cared for) by the Pecos County Historical Commission.

    Please refer to this archival Fort Stockton Pioneer article, written by Barbara Kipgen for the historical background:

    https://fortstockton.advantage-preservation.com/viewer/?k=cockrell&i=f&d=01011908-12312020&m=between&ord=k1&fn=the_fort_stockton_pioneer_usa_texas_fort_stockton_20171019_english_1&df=1&dt=10

    signed Barbara Kipgen mbr Pecos County Historical Commission

    My mother attended this school as a ranch kid.

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    Reuse Historic Schools!

    by AmyHammons, 7 months ago
    My father's schoolhouse--built in the 1900s--served families for generations. Since the 1970s, the community has used the building as a gathering place for afternoon dominos, family reunions, and holiday celebrations. There are so many historic schools that easily could be rehabilitated and continue to serve communities. I'd love to know who else is working on this type of project and how we can support their efforts. Please share your stories!
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    Cute little farm!

    by IR, 7 months ago
    One of my favorite historic places in Texas is the Sauer-Beckmann Farm near Fredericksburg! It's not a long drive from Austin and it's totally charming. The farmhouse is about a hundred years old, and the staff operate it for real -- they cook food in the kitchen, store things in the pantry, etc. I visited once during Easter weekend and they were demonstrating the different types of natural dyes that families would have used in the olden days to make colorful eggs. Sometimes there's a turkey wandering around. It's just really pleasant!
Page last updated: 23 Apr 2022, 11:44 AM